Category

General Health

WHEN CANCER ISN’T REALLY CANCER

One of the hardest jobs as a physician is to tell a patient and family that they have been diagnosed with cancer. As a urologist dealing with prostate, bladder and kidney cancer, I often give potentially life-threatening diagnosis while simultaneously reassuring hope and optimism, a skill that requires a deft mastery of the art of...
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CORPORATIZATION OF MEDICINE: TRADING EXCELLENCE FOR MEDIOCRITY

Have you ever been to a doctor’s office and felt that your evaluation was rushed? Have you been seen in the emergency room and felt that you were just a number in a long series of patients? Have you ever seen the same doctor for years and felt like the doctor just met you for...
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A Case of a Uterovaginal Fistula

“Dr. Rahman, this is the nurse in OR 12, Dr. H is doing a robotic/laparoscopic hysterectomy, he thinks he’s injured the ureter, and is requesting help. Are you available?” There was a surge of adrenaline in my system as I answered this call in my office, as I know what came next was going to...
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CAUSATION VS. CORRELATION: THAT IS THE QUESTION!

In the early 1990s large scale studies demonstrated that patient’s undergoing vasectomies had a higher risk of prostate cancer. The common explanation was that there was some statistical correlation between these two findings (perhaps stemming from a younger population exposed to a urologist, i.e. those undergoing vasectomies, were more likely to engage in prostate cancer...
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FROM THE TRENCHES: SATISFACTION IN SIMPLICITY

“I am really uncomfortable and in pain,” said Elaine, tearfully as I met her in the preoperative area for the first time. She had a very sad and difficult history, dealing with complications from childbirth nearly two years ago. She had developed a communication between her rectum and vagina, which allowed feces to come out...
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AGING GRACEFULLY AND LONGEVITY: PEOPLE, PURPOSE, PLANTS AND PEDESTRIAN

I am often amazed at how some patients have aged so gracefully well into their 80s and 90s, active with a sharp memory, fully ambulatory and self-sufficient, while others (often quite younger), seem so debilitated.  While good genes and family history are important, disposition and lifestyle influence these outcomes as well.  Social scientists have studied...
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